Maker Camp, Part 1

Summer came, and I started scrambling. Summer Reading Program! Final semester! Finishing my internship! ALA Annual! Maker Camp!  Now, summer is over (or nearly – kids started back to school today in a lot of Pittsburgh), and I’m taking a brief moment to figure out what exactly I did this summer, and how I did it.

There’s only so much time in a week, as obvious as that sounds. But when lots of projects compete with each other for those limited hours, and all of the projects are worthwhile on their own, tough cuts have to be made. I was in charge of Summer Reading, with all its attendant programs, paperwork, and promotion, as well as a kindergarten prep class, and Maker Camp. But I was lucky. The director completely had my back and was willing to cover things. A friend of mine with only slightly less on her plate agreed to teach the kindergarten prep storytimes, and we managed to find her a stipend for doing so. Summer Reading Program ended up being a lot of front end work (marketing, organizing programs, etc.), which cooled down over the semester.

Which leaves Maker Camp. I’ll call this one my darling project, since I signed the library up for it. And getting a box of really cool maker swag goes a long way toward boosting any flagging interest in the program. The first box looked a lot like this, with t-shirts and such for the kids:

http://playmakesharestudio.remlc.com/2013/07/maker-camp-swag.html
Via Play Make Share Studio, 2013

The second box had SO MUCH STUFF. Here’s the official list:

Maker Screen Shot

 

The LEDs and coin cell battieres were the big ones for us. We used those in about 4 different projects. The Arduino was cool, but we never really got to use it – our camp was too short every day, and the kids came in with no programming background. We had a Hummingbird Robotics Kit donated to us, though, and used CREATE Visual Programmer to build some basic robots with the kids. That was by far the favorite program. It was quick, easy to set up, and allowed the kids to exercise complete autonomy once they learned the programming tool. I’d like to step it up to Scratch or Snap next time, but we had mostly 9-12 year olds (the camp is generally for 13+), so this was at least a great introduction to the hardware of robots and the concept of programming logic.

Here’s the Hummingbird Kit:

Via http://www.adafruit.com/blog/2012/09/13/new-product-hummingbird-robotics-kit/
Via http://www.adafruit.com/blog/2012/09/13/new-product-hummingbird-robotics-kit/

And here’s a couple videos of the kids making things with it:


The library will be launching Maker Mondays this fall, and I’m excited to see what the library staff does with all of the amazing tools we got. Several of the pieces in the Hummingbird broke from heavy kid usage, but can totally be soldered back together, creating a really nice learning opportunity for both staff (who are brand new to this making thing) and some of the kids.

More thoughts and projects from Maker Camp to come!

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